History articles

Link: Four Thousand Years Ago, Indians landed in Australia

Lulu Morris, National Geographic


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Genetic evidence suggests that just over 4 millennia ago a group of Indian travellers landed in Australia and stayed. The evidence emerged a few years ago after a group of Aboriginal men’s Y chromosomes matched with Y chromosomes typically found in Indian men.  Up until now, the exact details, though, have been unclear…

The Empires of the Sun and the West

Eva Brann


Link to article

A comprehensive discussion on the contact between the Aztec, Inca, and Spanish cultures.

I shall begin with two sets of facts and dates. On or about August 8 of 1519 Hernán Cortés, a hidalgo, a knight, from Medellin in the Estremadura region of Spain, having sailed his expeditionary fleet from Cuba to win “vast and wealthy lands,” set out from a city he called Villa Rica de la Vera Cruz on the Gulf of Mexico to march inland, west toward the capital of Anahuac, the empire of the Nahuatl-speaking Aztecs. The city was called Tenochtitlan and its lord, the emperor, was Montezuma Cortés knew of the place from the emperor’s coastal vassals and from delegations Montezuma had sent loaded with presents to welcome—and to forestall—the invaders. The presents included many works of well-crafted gold…

On Bechamp and Pleomorphism

The Life Enthusiast


Article

“…all natural organic matters (matters that once lived), absolutely protected from atmospheric germs, invariably and spontaneously alter and ferment, because they necessarily and inherently contain within themselves the agents of their spontaneous alteration, digestion, dissolution”. These agents are of course the self same Protits of Enderlein. As noted, Béchamp called them Microzymas. He proved that all animal and plant cells contain these tiny particles which continue to live after the death of the organism and out of which microorganisms can develop. In his book Mycrozymas, Béchamp laid the foundation for the concept of pleomorphism….”

My life, up to the age of forty, had been spent in my native city of Philadelphia…

Edmund Morris


The first two chapters of ‘Ten Acres is Enough’.

THE MAN WHO FEEDS his cattle on a thousand hills may possibly see the title of this little volume paraded through the newspapers; but the chances are that he will never think it worthwhile to look into the volume itself. The owner of a hundred acres will scarcely step out of his way to purchase or to borrow it, while the lord of every smaller farm will be sure it is not intended for him.

Few persons belonging to these various classes have been educated to believe that ten acres are enough. Born to greater ambition, they have aimed higher and grasped at more, sometimes wisely, sometimes not. Many of these are now owning or cultivating more land than their heads or purses enable them to manage properly. Had their ambition been moderate and their ideas more practical, their labor would be better rewarded, and this book, without doubt, would have found more readers.

Link: The Origin of a “Revolutionary Theory”

Helian.net


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Eugene Marais was a human community in the person of one man. He was a poet, an advocate, a journalist, a story-teller, a drug addict, a psychologist, a natural scientist. He embraced the pains of many, the visions of the few, and perhaps the burden was too much for one man… As a scientist he was unique, supreme in his time, yet a worker in a science then unborn. – R. Ardrey, The Soul of the Ape (Introduction)

Link: Some facts and figures about Universal Suffrage in the UK

William Collins


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The popular belief is that the suffragettes won the vote for women and before that men already had the vote. Both these beliefs are false. The property-based right to vote goes back at least to King Henry VI in 1432, when it was established that only people owning property worth 40 shillings or more could vote. Since this sum remained unchanged over centuries, the natural effect of inflation was to increase the size of the electorate. But even by the eighteenth century, the electorate was still only about 1% or 2% of the population

The Cult of the Microbe: The Origin of ‘Preventive Medicine’

Ethel Hume


Extract from the book ‘Bechamp or Pasteur?’

Hume describes the origin of the cult of the germ theory of disease. It was at the beginning of 1873 that Pasteur was elected by a majority of one vote to a place among the Free Associates of the Academy of Medicine. His ambition had indeed spurred him to open ‘a new era in medical physiology and pathology’, but it would seem to have been unfortunate for the world that instead of putting forward the fuller teaching of Béchamp, he fell back upon the cruder ideas now widely known as the ‘germ theory’ of disease.

It was at the beginning of 1873 that Pasteur was elected by a majority of one vote to a place among the Free Associates of the Academy of Medicine. His ambition had indeed spurred him to open ‘a new era in medical physiology and pathology’, but it would seem to have been unfortunate for the world that instead of putting forward the fuller teaching of Béchamp he fell back upon the cruder ideas now widely known as the ‘germ theory’ of disease.

A History of the Germ Theory

R. Pearson


Extract from Bechamp or Pasteur?

If you go back into the history of the medical profession and the various ideas regarding the cause of disease that were held by leading physicians before Pasteur first promulgated his notorious “germ theory”, you will find convincing evidence that Pasteur discovered nothing, and that he deliberately appropriated, falsified and perverted another man’s work. The ‘germ theory’, so-called, long antedated Pasteur – so long, in fact, that he was able to present it as new; and he got away with it.

My Early Life

Nikola Tesla


Extract from the book ‘My Inventions’

The first chapter of Tesla’s book contains his recollections of his childhood.

“The progressive development of man is vitally dependent on invention. It is the most important product of his creative brain. Its ultimate purpose is the complete mastery of mind over the material world, the harnessing of the forces of nature to human needs. This is the difficult task of the inventor, who is often misunderstood and unrewarded.” – Tesla.

The Dream and Lie of Louis Pasteur

Pearson’s book, originally published in the 1940’s, under the title Pasteur, Plagiarist, Imposter, is an excellent introduction to the theory and practice of Pasteur’s “science”, his inability to fully understand the concepts he was appropriating, and the consequences of the vaccines that he and his followers created.

Louis Pasteur built his reputation and altered the course of twentieth century science by plagiarizing and distorting the work Antoine Bechamp.

Pearson exposes facts concerning Pasteur which are still being ignored today, and provides a detailed historical background to the current controversy surrounding vaccination. The wierd thing is that even during Pasteur’s lifetime, there were people who were saying that he was wrong, and that he knew he was wrong, but Pasteur was good at playing politics, and was in with the ruling class, so he won.