Tag: Agriculture

My life, up to the age of forty, had been spent in my native city of Philadelphia…

Edmund Morris


The first two chapters of ‘Ten Acres is Enough’.

THE MAN WHO FEEDS his cattle on a thousand hills may possibly see the title of this little volume paraded through the newspapers; but the chances are that he will never think it worthwhile to look into the volume itself. The owner of a hundred acres will scarcely step out of his way to purchase or to borrow it, while the lord of every smaller farm will be sure it is not intended for him.

Few persons belonging to these various classes have been educated to believe that ten acres are enough. Born to greater ambition, they have aimed higher and grasped at more, sometimes wisely, sometimes not. Many of these are now owning or cultivating more land than their heads or purses enable them to manage properly. Had their ambition been moderate and their ideas more practical, their labor would be better rewarded, and this book, without doubt, would have found more readers.

Ten Acres is Enough

Edmund Morris


Paperback, Kindle.

“Recently we have seen a great back-to-the-land movement, with many young professional people returning to small scale farming; thus it is great fun to read about someone who did exactly the same thing in 1864. In that year, Mr. Edmund Morris gave up his business and city life for a farm of ten acres, made a go of mixed farming and then wrote a book about it. Mr. Morris proves Abraham Lincoln’s prediction: ‘The greatest fine art of the future will be the making of a comfortable living from a small piece of land’.” – Sally Fallon, The Weston Price Foundation

Reconstruction By Way of the Soil

Guy Wrench


Paperback, Kindle, epub.

Reconstruction by Way of the Soil uses case studies from Ancient Rome, nomadic societies, medieval England, Africa and Egypt, the West Indies, Russia, Australia and the USA to show that nothing is more important and fundamental than the relationship between civilization and the soil. The book takes us through the history of some of the world’s most important civilizations, concentrating on the relationship between humanity and the soil. Guy Wrench shows how farming practices, and the care – or lack of care – with which the soil is treated has brought about both the rise and fall of civilizations.

Friend Earthworm

George Oliver


Paperback

George Oliver returns the reader to a time and methodology where people took responsibility for what they did and what they produced. In this world of spiraling food prices, huge landfills, diminishing food supplies, loss of topsoil, and water pollution, the reader is gently chastised for “letting someone else do it” and being “just too busy.” We were once a self-reliant nation; now we outsource. Oliver shows the reader what is wrong and why. And the book is about earthworms.